Active members

September 18, 2013
In many situations involving disability, the employer may request medical information to assess what suitable accommodation measures are required. In other situations, medical information is unnecessary since the accommodation may be obvious.   In cases where medical information is necessary to support a request for accommodation, here are some important points to remember:  
September 18, 2013
The responsibilities of the employer include: to proactively “build conceptions of equality into workplace standards”; to design workplace requirements and standards so that, from the outset, they do not discriminate;
September 18, 2013
The worker requiring accommodation has the following responsibilities: to identify and communicate the need for accommodation, if possible; to inform the employer of any changes to the accommodation needs; to collaborate with the employer and the union to find the most appropriate accommodation, if possible; to communicate with the Union and the employer;
September 18, 2013
The responsibilities of the union representative include: to insist that the employer fulfills its duty to design workplace requirements and standards so that, from the outset, they do not discriminate; to model a problem-solving approach to accommodation; to represent the needs of the worker for accommodation; to collaborate with the worker and the employer in accommodating the worker; to respond to employer accommodation proposals;
September 18, 2013
Co-workers need to understand what the duty to accommodate is and why it is valuable for the whole workplace. It is not helpful if other workers feel that a co-worker is receiving “special treatment”. The duty to accommodate must be approached in a problem-solving way , involving everyone who will be affected, at least through education. But it is important to remember that others may not be entitled to know about specific workers’ disabilities due to confidentiality and privacy issues.
September 18, 2013
A BFOR is a legal term for the essential tasks required to perform a job. If an employer can establish a particular BFOR that cannot be modified/adapted for an accommodation, they may not have to accommodate a worker in that job. BFORs are not preferences; they are dutuies or elements that are essential to the job.
September 18, 2013
It is important in identifying BFORs to differentiate between tasks or skills that appear to be essential, as opposed to those that are essential.
September 18, 2013
The human rights legislation that applies to your workplace The right to reasonable accommodation stems from the various pieces of legislation that apply to the workplace in question.
September 18, 2013
Employers have a duty to be proactive in designing workplace policies and standards in a way that does not discriminate in the first place. But when a situation arises where a worker needs accommodation in order to perform his/her duties or participate fully in the workplace, Workers have an obligation to advise the employer of the accommodations they may require.
September 16, 2013
Our online program offers union training at your own pace and time. These introductory courses provide a solid overview on a range of topics. Explore the union’s basic roles and responsibilities including the services it provides all members. There are courses to explain PSAC’s structure and how to get involved. There are courses about the history of the union movement to provide background and context for our ongoing struggles. We hope they inspire and motivate you to engage with your union.

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